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Mobile-Friendly Websites: Are You Ready?

It’s long overdue.
Any professional web design company (including our own) offers mobile responsiveness to all of their client’s websites. But there is still a surprising number of websites out there that aren’t responsive at all.
But as people’s ways of accessing the internet keep changing, patience for non-mobile friendly websites will wear thin. Indeed, Google has already rolled out a mobile-friendly update to their algorithm on April 21st
What the update did was create a different set of search results for people searching Google from their smartphones or tablets. Most people expected non-responsive websites to be severely devalued, but that didn’t prove to be the case.
But make no mistake: this update may have spared you, but the clock is ticking.
While the impact to your business could end up being catastrophic in the long the run, the good news is that you can make your website responsive in as little as …

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Should You Add An SSL Certificate To Your Website?

The Answer May Not Be “Yes” Just Yet, But It Will Be Soon.
Secure-socket layer encryption (SSL) is nothing new for websites: since the early days of the internet in the late-nineties any respectable website that took personal information from you (i.e. payment information, login info, etc.) would use SSL encryption to help protect your information from malicious eavesdroppers.
But there has a recent trend towards a mostly SSL-encrypted internet.
Google has moved to add SSL to their Google searches, encrypting all of your Google searches so that no one can eavesdrop on what you’re searching for (except for Google). If you’re a webmaster and have a Google analytics account, you may have noticed that most of your web traffic’s incoming keywords are placed under “not provided”. This is because Google no longer wants to share what people are searching for anymore.
And with Google’s recent statements, they may be wanting …

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WordPress: Posts vs. Pages

If you’ve never used Wordpress before you might have noticed when you logged in that there are two kinds of content you can add: posts and pages. So what’s the difference and what should you use? Well that depends on how you want to set up your website and how often you will be adding content, and what kind. You may even find that you want to make use of both! I’ll outline the chief difference between the two below.

Posts

When you first install Wordpress the default set up has your homepage as a list of posts, with the most recent one on the top. That’s because Wordpress was originally created as blogging software before it was expanded to be a general purpose content management system. The default setting is what is called a ‘blog style’ website. This might work well for you and your needs if you will be …